Important Information

  1. Regulatory Information

    Halifax Share Dealing Limited trading as the Bank of Scotland Share Dealing Service.  Halifax Share Dealing Limited.  Registered in England No. 3195646.  Registered Office: Trinity Road, Halifax, West Yorkshire, HX1 2RG.  Authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority, 25 The North Colonnade, Canary Wharf, London, E14 5HS.  A Member of the London Stock Exchange and an HM Revenue & Customs Approved ISA Manager.

    The levels and bases of taxation can change and the value of any tax advantages to you will depend on your individual circumstances. Where applicable, we will collect for you any income that we are able to reclaim on your behalf.

    This website contains links to sites operated by persons outside our group of companies. We are not responsible for the privacy practices, content or the products and services provided through these sites

    The information within this site is based on our understanding of current law and practice and is subject to any changes of legislation or regulations.

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  2. Who looks after your personal information

     Your personal information will be held by Halifax Share Dealing Limited which trades as Bank of Scotland Share Dealing, part of the Lloyds Banking Group. More information on the Group can be found at www.lloydsbankinggroup.com

    How we use your personal information

    This privacy notice is to let you know how companies within the Group promise to look after your personal information. This includes what you tell us about yourself, what we learn by having you as a customer, and the choices you give us about what marketing you want us to send you. This notice explains how we do this and tells you about your privacy rights and how the law protects you.

    Our Privacy Promise

    We promise:

    •To keep your data safe and private.
    •Not to sell your data.
    •To give you ways to manage and review your marketing choices at any time.

    Data Protection law will change on 25 May 2018

    This notice sets out most of your rights under the new laws. We’ll update it again between now and 25 May 2018 when changes come into effect.

    Who we are

    Lloyds Banking Group is made up of many different legal entities. We'll let you know which you have a relationship with, when you take out a product or service with us. You can find out more about us at www.lloydsbankinggroup.com.
    If you have any questions, or want more details about how we use your personal information, you can ask us using our secure online contact form. Or you can call us on 0345 721 3141 (+44 1313 37 42 18 from outside the UK).

    How the law protects you

    As well as our Privacy Promise, your privacy is protected by law. This section explains how that works.

    Data Protection law says that we are allowed to use personal information only if we have a proper reason to do so. This includes sharing it outside Lloyds Banking Group. The law says we must have one or more of these reasons:

    • To fulfil a contract we have with you, or
    • When it is our legal duty, or
    • When it is in our legitimate interest, or
    • When you consent to it.

    A legitimate interest is when we have a business or commercial reason to use your information. But even then, it must not unfairly go against what is right and best for you. If we rely on our legitimate interest, we will tell you what that is.

    Here is a list of all the ways that we may use your personal information, and which of the reasons we rely on to do so. This is also where we tell you what our legitimate interests are.

    What we use your personal information for:Our reasonsOur legitimate interests
    • To manage our relationship with you or your business.
    • To develop new ways to meet our customers’ needs and to grow our business.
    • To develop and carry out marketing activities.
    • To study how our customers use products and services from us and other organisations.
    • Your consent.
    • Fulfilling contracts.
    • Our legitimate interests.
    • Our legal duty.

    • Keeping our records up to date, working out which of our products and services may interest you and telling you about them.
    • Developing products and services, and what we charge for them.
    • Defining types of customers for new products or services.
    • Seeking your consent when we need it to contact you.
    • Being efficient about how we fulfil our legal
    • To develop and manage our brands, products and services.
    • To test new products.
    • To manage how we work with other companies that provide services to us and our customers.
    • Fulfilling contracts.
    • Our legitimate interests.
    • Our legal duty.
    • Developing products and services, and what we charge for them.
    • Defining types of customers for new products or services.
    • Being efficient about how we fulfil our legal and contractual duties.
    • To deliver of our products and services.
    • To make and manage customer payments.
    • To manage fees, charges and interest due on customer accounts.
    • To collect and recover money that is owed to us.
    • To manage and provide treasury and investment products and services.
    • Fulfilling contracts.
    • Our legitimate interests.
    • Our legal duty.
    • Being efficient about how we fulfil our legal and contractual duties.
    • Complying with regulations that apply to us.
    • To detect, investigate, report, and seek to prevent financial crime.
    • To manage risk for us and our customers.
    • To obey laws and regulations that apply to us.
    • To respond to complaints and seek to resolve them.
    • Fulfilling contracts.
    • Our legitimate interests.
    • Our legal duty.
    • Developing and improving how we deal with financial crime, as well as doing our legal duties in this respect .
    • Complying with regulations that apply to us.
    • Being efficient about how we fulfil our legal and contractual duties.

    • To run our business in an efficient and proper way. This includes managing our financial position, business capability, planning, communications, corporate governance, and audit.
    • Our legitimate interests.
    • Our legal duty.
    • Complying with regulations that apply to us.
    • Being efficient about how we fulfil our legal and contractual duties.
    • To exercise our rights set out in agreements or contracts.
    • Fulfilling contracts.

    Groups of Personal Information

    We use many different kinds of personal information, and group them together like this.

    Type of personal informationDescription
    Financial Your financial position, status and history.
    Contact Where you live and how to contact you.
    Socio-Demographic This includes details about your work or profession, nationality, education and where you fit into general social or income groupings.
    Transactional Details about payments to and from your accounts with us, and insurance claims you make.

    Contractual
    Details about the products or services we provide to you.
    Locational Data we get about where you are, such as may come from your mobile phone, the address where you connect a computer to the internet, or a shop where you buy something with your card.
    Behavioural Details about how you use our products and services.
    Technical Details on the devices and technology you use.
    Communications What we learn about you from letters, emails, and conversations between us.
    Social Relationships Your family, friends, and other relationships.
    Open Data and Public Records Details about you that are in public records such as the Electoral Register, and information about you that is openly available on the internet.
    Usage Data Other data about how you use our products and services.
    Documentary Data Details about you that are stored in documents in different formats, or copies of them. This could include things like your passport, drivers licence, or birth certificate.
    Special types of data

    The law and other regulations treat some types of personal information as special. We will only collect and use these types of data if the law allows us to do so:

    • Racial or ethnic origin
    • Religious or philosophical beliefs
    • Trade union membership
    • Health data including gender
    • Criminal convictions and offences

    Consents

    Any permissions, consents, or preferences that you give us. This includes things like how you want us to contact you, whether you get paper statements, or prefer large-print formats.

    National Identifier A number or code given to you by a government to identify who you are, such as a National Insurance number.

    Where we collect personal information from

    We may collect personal information about you (or your business) from other companies within the Lloyds Banking Group and from these sources:

    Data you give to us:

    • When you apply for our products and services
    • When you talk to us on the phone or in branch
    • When you use our websites, mobile device apps, web chat or SignVideo services
    • In emails and letters
    • In insurance claims or other documents
    • In financial reviews and interviews
    • In customer surveys
    • If you take part in our competitions or promotions.

    Data we collect when you use our services. This includes the amount, frequency, type, location, origin and recipients:

    • Payment and transaction data.
    • Profile and usage data. This includes the profile you create to identify yourself when you connect to our internet, mobile and telephone services. It also includes other data about how you use those services. We gather this data from devices you use to connect to those services, such as computers and mobile phones, using cookies and other internet tracking software.

    Data from third parties we work with:

    • Companies that introduce you to us
    • Financial advisers
    • Card associations
    • Credit reference agencies
    • Insurers
    • Retailers
    • Comparison websites
    • Social networks
    • Fraud prevention agencies
    • Payroll service providers
    • Land agents
    • Public information sources such as Companies House
    • Loyalty scheme operators
    • Agents working on our behalf
    • Market researchers
    • Medical practitioners*
    • Government and law enforcement agencies.

    * For some insurance products, we may ask your GP or other medical professional to send us a report. We will only do this if we get your consent first.

    Who we share your personal information with

    We may share your personal information with companies within the Lloyds Banking Group and these organisations:

    • Agents and advisers who we use to help run your accounts and services, collect what you owe, and explore new ways of doing business
    • HM Revenue & Customs, regulators and other authorities
    • UK Financial Services Compensation Scheme
    • Credit reference agencies
    • Fraud prevention agencies
    • Any party linked with you or your business’s product or service
    • Companies we have a joint venture or agreement to co-operate with
    • Organisations that introduce you to us
    • Companies that we introduce you to
    • Market researchers
    • Independent Financial Advisors
    • Price comparison websites and similar companies that offer ways to research and apply for financial products and services
    • Companies you ask us to share your data with.

    We may need to share your personal information with other organisations to provide you with the product or service you have chosen:

    • If you have a debit, credit or charge card with us, we will share transaction details with companies which help us to provide this service (such as Visa and Mastercard).
    • If you have a product which has a loyalty scheme, like Avios, we will share your data with that scheme.
    • If you use direct debits, we will share your data with the Direct Debit scheme.
    • If you apply for insurance through us, we may pass your personal or business details to the insurer, and onto any reinsurers.
    • If you make an insurance claim, information you give to us or the insurer may be put on a register of claims. This will be shared with other insurers.
    • If you have a secured loan or mortgage with us, we may share information with other lenders who also hold a charge on the property.

    We may also share your personal information if the make-up of Lloyds Banking Group changes in the future:

    • We may choose to sell, transfer, or merge parts of our business, or our assets. Or we may seek to acquire other businesses or merge with them.
    • During any such process, we may share your data with other parties. We’ll only do this if they agree to keep your data safe and private.
    • If the change to our Group happens, then other parties may use your data in the same way as set out in this notice

    How we use your information to make automated decisions

    We sometimes use systems to make automated decisions based on personal information we have – or are allowed to collect from others – about you or your business. This helps us to make sure our decisions are quick, fair, efficient and correct, based on what we know. These automated decisions can affect the products, services or features we may offer you now or in the future, or the price that we charge you for them.

    Here are the types of automated decision we make:

    Pricing

    We may decide what to charge for some products and services based on what we know.

    Tailoring products and services

    We may place you in groups with similar customers. These are called customer segments. We use these to study and learn about our customers’ needs, and to make decisions based on what we learn. This helps us to design products and services for different customer segments, and to manage our relationships with them.

    Detecting fraud

    We use your personal information to help decide if your personal or business accounts may be being used for fraud or money-laundering. We may detect that an account is being used in ways that fraudsters work. Or we may notice that an account is being used in a way that is unusual for you or your business. If we think there is a risk of fraud, we may stop activity on the accounts or refuse access to them.

    Opening accounts

    When you open an account with us, we check that the product or service is relevant for you, based on what we know. We also check that you or your business meets the conditions needed to open the account. This may include checking age, residency, nationality or financial position.

    Approving credit

    We use a system to decide whether to lend money to you or your business, when you apply for credit such as a loan or credit card. This is called credit scoring. It uses past data to assess how you’re likely to act while paying back any money you borrow. This includes data about similar accounts you may have had before.

    Credit scoring uses data from three sources:

    • Your application form
    • Credit reference agencies
    • Data we may already hold.

    It gives an overall assessment based on this. Banks and other lenders use this to help us make responsible lending decisions that are fair and informed.

    Credit scoring methods are tested regularly to make sure they are fair and unbiased.

    Your rights

    As a person you have rights over automated decisions.

    • You can ask that we do not make our decision based on the automated score alone.
    • You can object to an automated decision, and ask that a person reviews it.

    If you want to know more about these rights, please contact us.

    Credit Reference Agencies (CRAs)

    We carry out credit and identity checks when you apply for a product or services for you or your business. We may use Credit Reference Agencies to help us with this.

    If you use our services, from time to time we may also search information that the CRAs have, to help us manage those accounts.

    We will share your personal information with CRAs and they will give us information about you. The data we exchange can include:

    • Name, address and date of birth
    • Credit application
    • Details of any shared credit
    • Financial situation and history
    • Public information, from sources such as the electoral register and Companies House.

    We’ll use this data to:

    • Assess whether you or your business is able to afford to make repayments
    • Make sure what you’ve told us is true and correct
    • Help detect and prevent financial crime
    • Manage accounts with us
    • Trace and recover debts
    • Make sure that we tell you about relevant offers.

    We will go on sharing your personal information with CRAs for as long as you are a customer. This will include details about your settled accounts and any debts not fully repaid on time. It will also include details of funds going into the account, and the account balance. If you borrow, it will also include details of your repayments and whether you repay in full and on time. The CRAs may give this information to other organisations that want to check credit status. We will also tell the CRAs when you settle your accounts with us.

    When we ask CRAs about you or your business, they will note it on your credit file. This is called a credit search. Other lenders may see this and we may see credit searches from other lenders.

    If you apply for a product with someone else, we will link your records with theirs. We will do the same if you tell us you have a spouse, partner or civil partner – or that you are in business with other partners or directors.

    You should tell them about this before you apply for a product or service. It is important that they know your records will be linked together, and that credit searches may be made on them.

    CRAs will also link your records together. These links will stay on your files unless one of you asks the CRAs to break the link. You will normally need to give proof that you no longer have a financial link with each other.

    You can find out more about the CRAs on their websites, in the Credit Reference Agency Information Notice. This includes details about:

    • Who they are
    • Their role as fraud prevention agencies
    • How they share personal information
    • How long they can keep data
    • Your data protection rights.

    Here are links to the information notice for each of the three main Credit Reference Agencies:

    Callcredit

    Equifax

    Experian

    Fraud Prevention Agencies (FPAs)

    We may need to confirm your identity before we provide products or services to you or your business. Once you have become a customer of ours, we will also share your personal information as needed to help detect fraud and money-laundering risks. We use Fraud Prevention Agencies to help us with this.

    Both we and fraud prevention agencies can only use your personal information if we have a proper reason to do so. It must be needed either for us to obey the law, or for a ‘legitimate interest’.

    A legitimate interest is when we have a business or commercial reason to use your information. This must not unfairly go against what is right and best for.

    We will use the information to:

    • Confirm identities
    • Help prevent fraud and money-laundering
    • Fulfil any contracts you or your business has with us.

    We or an FPA may allow law enforcement agencies to access your personal information. This is to support their duty to detect, investigate, prevent and prosecute crime.

    FPAs can keep personal information for different lengths of time. They can keep your data for up to six years if they find a risk of fraud or money-laundering.

    The information we use

    These are some of the kinds of personal information that we use:

    • Name
    • Date of birth
    • Residential address
    • History of where you have lived
    • Contact details, such as email addresses and phone numbers
    • Financial data
    • Data relating to your or your businesses products or services
    • Employment details
    • Vehicle details
    • Data that identifies computers or other devices you use to connect to the internet. This includes your Internet Protocol (IP) address.

    Automated decisions for fraud prevention

    The information we have for you or your business is made up of what you tell us, and data we collect when you use our services, or from third parties we work with.

    We and FPAs may process your personal information in systems that look for fraud by studying patterns in the data. We may find that an account is being used in ways that fraudsters work. Or we may notice that an account is being used in a way that is unusual for you or your business. Either of these could indicate a possible risk of fraud or money-laundering.

    How this can affect you

    If we or an FPA decide there is a risk of fraud, we may stop activity on the accounts or block access to them. FPAs will also keep a record of the risk that you or your business may pose.

    This may result in other organisations refusing to provide you with products or services, or to employ you.

    Data transfers out of the EEA

    FPAs may send personal information to countries outside the European Economic Area (‘EEA’). When they do, there will be a contract in place to make sure the recipient protects the data to the same standard as the EEA. This may include following international frameworks for making data sharing secure.

    Sending data outside of the EEA

    We will only send your data outside of the European Economic Area (‘EEA’) to:

    • Follow your instructions.
    • Comply with a legal duty.
    • Work with our agents and advisers who we use to help run your accounts and services.

    If we do transfer information to our agents or advisers outside of the EEA, we will make sure that it is protected in the same way as if it was being used in the EEA. We’ll use one of these safeguards:

    • Transfer it to a non-EEA country with privacy laws that give the same protection as the EEA. Learn more on the European Commission Justice website
    • Put in place a contract with the recipient that means they must protect it to the same standards as the EEA. Read more about this here on the European Commission Justice website
    • Transfer it to organisations that are part of Privacy Shield. This is a framework that sets privacy standards for data sent between the US and EU countries. It makes sure those standards are similar to what is used within the EEA. You can find out more about data protection on the European Commission Justice website

    If you choose not to give personal information

    We may need to collect personal information by law, or under the terms of a contract we have with you.

    If you choose not to give us this personal information, it may delay or prevent us from meeting our obligations. It may also mean that we cannot perform services needed to run your accounts or policies. It could mean that we cancel a product or service you have with us.

    Any data collection that is optional would be made clear at the point of collection.

    Marketing

    We may use your personal information to tell you about relevant products and offers. This is what we mean when we talk about ‘marketing’.

    The personal information we have for you is made up of what you tell us, and data we collect when you use our services, or from third parties we work with.

    We study this to form a view on what we think you may want or need, or what may be of interest to you. This is how we decide which products, services and offers may be relevant for you.

    We can only use your personal information to send you marketing messages if we have either your consent or a ‘legitimate interest’. That is when we have a business or commercial reason to use your information. It must not unfairly go against what is right and best for you.

    You can ask us to stop sending you marketing messages by contacting us at any time.

    Whatever you choose, you'll still receive statements, and other important information such as changes to your existing products and services.

    We may ask you to confirm or update your choices, if you take out any new products or services with us in future. We will also ask you to do this if there are changes in the law, regulation, or the structure of our business.

    If you change your mind you can update your choices at any time by contacting us.

    How long we keep your personal information

    We will keep your personal information for as long as you are a customer of Lloyds Banking Group.

    After you stop being a customer, we may keep your data for up to 10 years for one of these reasons:

    • To respond to any questions or complaints.
    • To show that we treated you fairly.
    • To maintain records according to rules that apply to us.

    We may keep your data for longer than 10 years if we cannot delete it for legal, regulatory or technical reasons. We may also keep it for research or statistical purposes. If we do, we will make sure that your privacy is protected and only use it for those purposes.

    How to get a copy of your personal information

    You can access your personal information we hold by filling in this form or by writing to us at this address:

    DSAR
    PO Box 791
    Leeds
    LS1 9LR

    Letting us know if your personal information is incorrect

    You have the right to question any information we have about you that you think is wrong or incomplete. Please contact us if you want to do this.

    If you do, we will take reasonable steps to check its accuracy and correct it.

    What if you want us to stop using your personal information?

    You have the right to object to our use of your personal information, or to ask us to delete, remove, or stop using your personal information if there is no need for us to keep it. This is known as the ‘right to object’ and ‘right to erasure’, or the ‘right to be forgotten’.

    There may be legal or other official reasons why we need to keep or use your data. But please tell us if you think that we should not be using it.

    We may sometimes be able to restrict the use of your data. This means that it can only be used for certain things, such as legal claims or to exercise legal rights. In this situation, we would not use or share your information in other ways while it is restricted.

    You can ask us to restrict the use of your personal information if:

    • It is not accurate.
    • It has been used unlawfully but you don’t want us to delete it.
    • It not relevant any more, but you want us to keep it for use in legal claims.
    • You have already asked us to stop using your data but you are waiting for us to tell you if we are allowed to keep on using it.

    If you want to object to how we use your data, or ask us to delete it or restrict how we use it or, please contact us.

    How to withdraw your consent

    You can withdraw your consent at any time. Please contact us if you want to do so.

    If you withdraw your consent, we may not be able to provide certain products or services to you. If this is so, we will tell you.

    How to complain

    Please let us know if you are unhappy with how we have used your personal information. You can contact us using our secure online contact form

    You also have the right to complain to the Information Commissioner’s Office. Find out on their website how to report a concern

    Future formats for sharing data

    The Data Privacy laws will change on 25 May 2018. From that date you will have the right to get your personal information from us in a format that can be easily re-used. You can also ask us to pass on your personal information in this format to other organisations.

    We are working with our industry to improve the way your data is shared. We’ll update this notice with more details before 25 May 2018.

    Cookies

    To find out more about how we use cookies please see our cookie notice.

    How you can contact us

    If you have any questions or require more information about how we use your personal information please contact at sharedealing@bankofscotland.co.uk. You can also call us on 0345 606 11 88.

    If you feel we have not answered your question Lloyds Banking Group has a Group Data Privacy Officer, who you can contact on 0345 602 1997 and tell us you want to speak to our Data Privacy Officer.

    Version Control

    Last updated February 2018

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  3. ISA Transfers

    By transferring your ISA it is possible that you may benefit from increased access to your account via our online dealing service and also our telephone opening hours. These may differ from the hours operated by your current manager.

    Before instructing any transfer you should examine all costs/charges in connection with the operation of your ISA.  Certain elements of our products may be priced differently than those of your current manager.

    Transfers of ISAs between managers may take several weeks to complete. You should be aware that you might be unable to deal for a period whilst the transfer is pending.

    There is the potential for a loss of income or growth following a rise in the markets whilst the transfer is in the course of being completed.

    Your current manager may impose exit charges and other costs associated with the transfer and you should ascertain to what extent you would be required to pay prior to instructing any transfer.

    There are no initial set up charges to pay in respect of our ISA products.

    Your current manager may allow transfers to other managers but only in the form of cash.   Prior to instructing any transfer you should ascertain whether or not this would apply as you may suffer losses as a result of buying back the shares, units etc. sold.

     

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  4. Self Invested Personal Pension (SIPP) Transfers

    By transferring your SIPP account it is possible that you may benefit from increased access to your account via our online dealing service and also our telephone opening hours. These may differ from the hours operated by your current provider.

    Before instructing any transfer you should examine all costs/charges in connection with the operation of your SIPP. Certain elements of our products may be priced differently than those of your current provider.

    Transfers of SIPP accounts between providers may take several weeks to complete. You should be aware that you might be unable to deal for a period whilst the transfer is pending.

    There is the potential for a loss of income or growth following a rise in the markets whilst the transfer is in the course of being completed.

    Your current provider may impose exit charges and other costs associated with the transfer and you should ascertain to what extent you would be required to pay prior to instructing any transfer.

    There is no initial set up charge to pay in respect of our SIPP account.

    Your current provider may allow transfers to other managers but only in the form of cash. Prior to instructing any transfer you should ascertain whether or not this would apply as you may suffer losses as a result of buying back the shares, units etc. sold.

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  5. Financial Conduct Authority

    At Bank of Scotland Share Dealing, we believe that this site tells you what you need to know to make an informed decision about our products.

    If you'd like more general information, the FCA, the financial services watchdog, provides a range of free consumer booklets and fact sheets and a Consumer Help line.

    Visit their website or call 0300 500 8082.

    The FCA can only give general information and cannot recommend the products of any company.

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  6. Market Abuse

    The Market Abuse Regulation which came into effect on 3rd July 2016 expressly prohibits insider dealing, market manipulation and misleading behaviour. Making statements or spreading rumours through the mass media or otherwise (e.g. internet chat rooms) which give or are likely to give a regular user of the stockmarket false or misleading impressions as to the supply of or demand for a listed share, can be a criminal offence.

    There are three main types of market abuse that are outlined below:

    6.1 Misuse of information
    Behaviour based on information which is not generally available, which if known, would be relevant to an investor's dealings in a particular stock.

    This is effectively dealing or encouraging someone else to deal using information about a stock that has not been released to the market.

    6.2 Creating a false or misleading impression
    Behaviour likely to give a false or misleading impression with regard to the supply and demand, or the price or value of an investment or stock.

    Internet bulletin boards are a popular mode of communication between investors, but these areas can be open to market abuse. For example: a person may post a message about a stock's profitability or a company's activities in order to incite other people to invest in the stock.

    6.3 Distorting the market
    Behaving in a way that leads to the manipulation of the price of an investment. This behaviour could lead to a false impression of the market price to investors.

    Penalties

    The Financial Conduct Authority has the power to impose an unlimited financial penalty on any individual (whether or not they are employed in the financial sector) where it can be proven that market abuse has occurred.

    You can find further information about the Market Abuse Regulation on the Financial Conduct Authority website at www.fca.org.uk or by phoning their helpline on 0300 500 8082.

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  7. Proving your identity

    We need you to prove your identity if you are a new customer opening a new account with us. Existing customers may also need to prove their identity when opening additional accounts.

    What can you use to prove your identity?

    You can use one of the following documents to prove your identity:

    Proof of identity – accepted documents

    • Unexpired passport with signature
    • Unexpired UK photo card full driving licence with signature.
    • Unexpired UK full paper driving licence with signature.
    • Unexpired UK photo card style provisional driving licence with signature.
    • Unexpired EU/EEA driving licence with photograph and signature - must be issued by a member state of the EU/EEA.
    • Unexpired firearms certificate.
    • Unexpired Northern Ireland voters card (aka Electoral Identity Card).
    • Unexpired EEA or equivalent jurisdiction national Identity card with photograph and signature.
    • Unexpired blue disabled driver’s pass – UK only, unexpired and needs to bear a passport-sized photograph, name and signature, expiry date and issuer details.
    • Unexpired biometric residence permit – issued by the Home Office.
    • UK benefits/state pension notification letters – must be from an official source, i.e. Job Centre Plus or Department for Work and Pensions / Local Authority, confirming the rights to a benefit. The letter must be dated within the last 12 months or current benefit period.
    • HM Revenue and Customs tax notification – must be a HMRC tax notification e.g. statement of account, notice of coding relating to the current year. P45s or P60s are not acceptable as these are not official HMRC documents.

    Other acceptable passports

    • Austria
    • Australia
    • Belgium
    • Canada
    • Denmark
    • Finland
    • France
    • Germany
    • Greece
    • Iceland
    • Ireland
    • Italy
    • Japan
    • Netherlands
    • New Zealand
    • Norway
    • Poland
    • Portugal
    • Spain
    • Sweden
    • United Kingdom (including Crown Dependencies i.e. Jersey, Guernsey & Isle of Man
    • USA

    What can you use to prove your address?

    You can use one of the following documents to prove your address:

    Other acceptable passports

    • Utility bill dated within the last 3 months – utility bills printed from the internet, mobile phone, broadband or internet provider bills, and any reminders or arrears letters are not acceptable.
    • Council tax demand letter or statement – valid for the current year or less than 12 months old. Reminders and arrears letters are not acceptable.
    • Unexpired UK photo card full driving licence with signature (only acceptable if it is not being used as your proof of identity).
    • Unexpired UK full paper driving licence with signature (only acceptable if it is not being used as your proof of identity).
    • Unexpired EU/EEA driving licence with photograph and signature - must be issued by a member state of the EU/EEA (only acceptable if it is not being used as your proof of identity).
    • Bank or building society statement – must be issued by a regulated financial sector firm in the UK, EU or equivalent jurisdiction and dated and showing transactions within the last 3 months. Statements showing interest only or carry forward balances are not acceptable – those printed from the internet or ISA statements are not acceptable.
    • Mortgage statement - must be issued by a regulated financial sector firm in the UK, EU or equivalent jurisdiction and dated within the last 12 months. Those printed from the internet are not acceptable.

    Existing customer verification

    If you've been contacted by our Retail Fraud department and need to visit your local branch with identification, here’s a list of acceptable ID to take with you (these must be originals, not photocopies).

    Acceptable identification:

    • A letter from our Retail Fraud department (if you’ve received one)
    • Proof of your Bank of Scotland account e.g. a debit card, passbook, statement.

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