Latest scams

Scams come in all shapes and sizes, from dodgy emails to fake sites. And they keep changing to try and trick you. Stay one step ahead by learning about the latest scams.

  • We’ve noticed that fraudsters are using social media to offer bank card refunds. The social media post may look like this:

    Who does it target?

    Anyone who uses social media and has an online bank account.

    How does it work?

    Fraudsters post adverts on social media saying they can get you a refund for recent card transactions. This is a scam.

    If you reply, the fraudster will ask for your Internet Banking  details. They’ll use these details to set up a new mobile device on your account.

    To get a refund, the fraudster uses the Mobile Banking app to dispute a genuine transaction.

    If a refund is made, the fraudster will then try to steal it through the app or by asking you to make a new payment.

    How to avoid this scam

    If you see a social media post like this, don’t reply. It’s a scam.

    Report it to the social media service where it appears.

    Keep your Internet Banking details private. Never share them with anyone else.

    Contact us right awayif you’ve shared your details.

    Top tips to avoid social media scams

    Double-check messages - Never reply to a message that asks for money or banking details. If it claims to be from a loved one, talk to them in person. Use a number you trust, not one from a message.

    Share with care - Keep your personal and banking details off social media. And only connect with people you know.

    Don’t be too quick to click - Fraudsters can use links within a message to send you to a fake site or to put a virus on your device.

    Use strong passwords - Choose a new, strong password for every account or site you use. Never use your personal details to create a password. Use random words and numbers.

    Find out more about social media scams>

  • Who does it target?

    Anyone with an Android device who uses Google Play.

    How does it work?

    Fraudsters are putting apps with hidden viruses on Google Play.

    It could be any kind of app, such as one for a QR code.

    A fake app may look genuine. But it might not install or work after it’s downloaded.

    This virus can cause serious harm to a device that’s very hard to fix.

    How to avoid this scam

    Install an antivirus on your device or ask a phone shop to do it for you.

    Use it to scan for viruses and follow its advice.

    Make sure a download is safe before you choose to get it.

    Look for reviews that mention problems, like a virus.

    Read the terms and conditions that come with an app.

    Top tips to keep your device safe

    1. Keep your device up-to-date - Make sure your device has the latest operating system (OS). Get updates as soon as they’re available. 
    2. Use an antivirus and firewall - Install an antivirus and keep it up-to-date. Keep your firewall on at all times.
    3. Download with care - Only download files and programmes you know are genuine that have come from a trusted source.
    4. Be Wi-Fi wise - When you’re away from home, only use genuine and secure Wi-Fi.
    5. Always log off - After you use any online account, log off. This can help to stop others from getting into your account.

    Find out more on how to keep your device safe

     

  • Fraudsters are sending messages on WhatsApp that pretend to be from your family or a friend.

    The messages could look like this:

    Image of a Whatsapp scam example

    Who does it target?

    Anyone with WhatsApp.

    How does it work?

    You get a message out of the blue that claims to be from a family member or a friend.

    The message will come from a new number that you don’t recognise.

    The fraudster will try to worry you and say there’s some kind of problem.

    They’ll ask you to pay money to a bank account.

    This is a scam

    What they want is for you to message back and believe their story.

    But it’s all a lie. The message is not from your family or a friend.

    How to avoid this scam

    If you get a message like this, don’t reply. Just delete it.

    Call your family or friend to check it’s real. Use a number you trust, like the one saved in your phone. Never call the number from the message. 

    Top tips to avoid scam messages

    1. Keep your money and details safe - Never move money, make a payment or give personal or banking details for a message that comes out of the blue.
    2. Click with care - Only click on a link or download an attachment if you’re sure it’s genuine.
    3. Look at the spelling and layout - If it has mistakes or looks odd in any way, don’t reply, just delete it.
    4. Take your time - A scam may use warnings or threats to try to get you to act without thinking.
    5. Double-check before you pay - Confirm payment details before you pay an invoice or bill. Call the person or business on a number you trust, not one from an invoice or message.

    Find out more about scam messages

     

  • NEW -  Bereaved family scam

    Fraudsters are pretending to be from genuine companies to demand money from people who have died.

    Who does it target?

    Anyone who is acting as the executor of a will. 

    How does it work?

    You get a letter that claims to be from a genuine company, such as a law firm.

    They demand payment of an unpaid debt, bill or similar that they say your loved one left behind. 

    How to avoid this scam

    If you get a letter like this, take your time to check it’s genuine.

    Call the company to talk to them in person. But use a phone number you trust, not one from a letter. 

    Make sure they sent the letter and can explain the payment.

    You can always ask your family or friends to help you check.

    Top tips to avoid scam invoices

    1. Take your time - A scam may seem urgent, use warnings or threats to try to get you to act without thinking.  
    2. Double-check before you pay - Confirm payment details before you pay an invoice or bill. Call the person or business on a number you trust, not one from an invoice or message.  

    Find out more on how to stay safe from scams

  • NEW - Royal Mail scam text

    Fraudsters are sending texts that pretend to come from Royal Mail.

    This is a scam that can look like this:

    Screenshot of scam text message

    Who does it target?

    Anyone with a mobile phone.

    How does it work?

    You get a text that claims to be from Royal Mail.

    It tells you that a parcel is awaiting delivery and to get it you need to click on a link to pay a fee.

    The link goes to a fake Royal Mail page that wants your personal and banking details. The page may look real but it’s a copy to try to scam you into giving your details.

    Remember, the Royal Mail won’t ask for banking details if you’re waiting for a parcel to arrive. 

    How to avoid this scam

    If you get an email or text like this, don’t click on the link or reply, just delete it.

    You can forward a scam text free of charge to 7726.

    And you can forward a scam email to security@bankofscotland.co.uk

    Top tips to avoid scam messages

    1. Keep your money and details safe - Never move money, make a payment or give personal or banking details for a message that comes out of the blue.
    2. Click with care - Only click on a link or download an attachment if you’re sure it’s genuine.
    3. Look at the spelling and layout - If it has mistakes or looks odd in any way, don’t reply and delete.
    4. Take your time - A scam may use warnings or threats to try to get you to act without thinking.
    5. Double-check before you pay - Confirm payment details before you pay an invoice or bill. Call the person or business on a number you trust, not one from an invoice or message.

    Find out more about scam messages

     

  • NEW - Amazon scam call

    Fraudsters are calling to pretend to be from Amazon.

    Who does it target?

    Anyone with a telephone.

    How does it work?

    You get a phone call that claims to be from Amazon.

    The call could say it’s about one of these things:

    • A refund.
    • Problem with your account.
    • Use of your account.

    The caller may know some details about you or your Amazon account. They could say they’re from the Amazon fraud team. Or that your bank account is the cause of the problem.

    This is a scam.

    What they want you to do is to download something to your device.

    This is how they will steal your money.

    How to avoid this scam

    If you get a call like this, hang up the phone.

    Amazon will never call to ask you to download something or make a payment outside of its website, such as a bank transfer. It’s rare for Amazon to call you about anything. If they do, they’ll never ask for personal details or offer a refund you didn’t expect.

    Top tips to avoid scam calls

    1. Hang up - If you’re not sure who’s calling, put down the phone.
    2. Call back - Use a number you trust, not one they use or may give you.
    3. Download with care - Unless you called for help, never download anything to your device for a call out of the blue. Amazon would never ask for remote access. 
    4. Keep your details private - Never share personal or banking details to a person who calls out of the blue.

    Find out more about scam calls

     

  • NEW - NHS COVID-19 vaccine scam message

    Fraudsters are sending emails and texts that offer the COVID-19 vaccine.

    Who does it target?

    Anyone with an email account or mobile phone.

    How does it work?

    You get an email or text that claims to be from the NHS.

    It offers the chance to sign up for the vaccine and wants you to click on a link.

    The link goes to a fake NHS page and wants you to give personal and banking details. The page may look real but it’s a copy to try to scam you into giving your details.

    Remember, the vaccine is free and the NHS will never ask for a payment or for your banking details.

    How to avoid this scam

    If you get an email or text like this, don’t click on the link or reply, just delete it.

    You can forward a scam email to security@bankofscotland.co.uk

    And you can forward a scam text free of charge to 7726.

    Top tips to avoid scam messages

    1. Keep your money and details safe - Never move money, make a payment or give personal or banking details for a message that comes out of the blue.
    2. Click with care - Only click on a link or download an attachment if you’re sure it’s genuine.
    3. Look at the spelling and layout - If it has mistakes or looks odd in any way, don’t reply and delete.
    4. Take your time - A scam may use warnings or threats to try to get you to act without thinking.
    5. Double-check before you pay - Confirm payment details before you pay an invoice or bill. Call the person or business on a number you trust, not one from an invoice or message.

    Find out more about scam messages

     

  • NEW - Working from home scam email

    This is an email scam that can look like this:

    Screenshot of scam email

    Who does it target?

    People working remotely from home.

    How does it work?

    Fraudsters send an email that claims to be from your employer’s IT support department.

    They can copy a company’s email address to make a message seem genuine.

    The message says you need new VPN configuration details to be able to work from home. It wants you to click on a link to get these details.

    The link goes to a fake Microsoft 365 login page. The page may look real but it’s a copy to try to scam your personal or financial details.

    How to avoid this scam

    If you get an email like this, don’t click on the link or reply. Just delete it.

    Top tips to avoid scam messages

    1. Keep your money and details safe - Never move money, make a payment or give personal or banking details for a message that comes out of the blue.
    2. Click with care - Only click on a link or download an attachment if you’re sure it’s genuine.
    3. Look at the spelling and layout - If it has mistakes or looks odd in any way, don’t reply and delete.
    4. Take your time - A scam may use warnings or threats to try to get you to act without thinking.
    5. Double-check before you pay - Confirm payment details before you pay an invoice or bill. Call the person or business on a number you trust, not one from an invoice or message.
  • NEW - Disney+ scam email

    This is an email scam that can look like this:

    Screenshot of scam email

    Who does it target?

    Disney+ customers.

    How does it work?

    Fraudsters send an email that claims there’s been ‘unusual activity’ on your account.

    The message says your account has been locked and you need to create a new password. It could also say

    that there’s been a problem with your card payment details.

    They want you to click an ‘update account now’ button.

    This button goes to a fake Disney+ page. The page may look real but it’s a copy to try to scam your personal or financial details.

    How to avoid this scam

    If you get an email like this, don’t click on the link.

    Delete the email. Don’t reply to it.

    Top tips to avoid scam messages

    1. Keep your money and details safe - Never move money, make a payment or give personal or banking details for a message that comes out of the blue.
    2. Click with care - Only click on a link or download an attachment if you’re sure it’s genuine.
    3. Look at the spelling and layout - If it has mistakes or looks odd in any way, don’t reply and delete.
    4. Take your time - A scam may use warnings or threats to try to get you to act without thinking.
    5. Double-check before you pay - Confirm payment details before you pay an invoice or bill. Call the person or business on a number you trust, not one from an invoice or message.
  • NEW - Bitcoin social media scam

    This is a social media scam that can look like this:

    Screenshot of scam Twitter messages

    Who does it target?

    Social media users, especially younger people.

    How does it work?

    Fraudsters are using social media to offer Bitcoin deals.

    They send a message that promises to double your money.

    This message has been seen on Twitter, Snapchat and Instagram.

    How to avoid this scam

    If you get a social media message about Bitcoin, don’t reply.

    Before you delete the message, you can report it to the social media platform.

    Top tips to avoid social media scams

    1. Double-check messages - If you get one out of the blue, it could be a scam. Make sure that a sender is genuine before you do anything else. If you don’t know them, don’t reply and delete.   
    2. Share with care - Keep personal and banking details private. What you share on social media can be used by fraudsters to steal your money.
    3. Only connect with people you know - If you’re not sure who someone is then don’t connect with them.
    4. Use strong passwords - Choose a new, strong password for every account or site you use.
  • NEW - Council tax scam email

    This is an email scam that can look like this:

    Screenshot of scam email

    Who does it target?

    Anyone with an email account.

    How does it work?

    Fraudsters send an email that claims to come from the Government Digital Service Team.

    The message offers a Council Tax Reduction of nearly £400 for people on a low income or who get benefits.

    It wants you to click a link to claim your refund.

    This link will go to a fake page to trick you in to giving banking details.

    How to avoid this scam

    If you get an email like this, don’t click on the link.

    Delete the email. Don’t reply to it.

    Top tips to avoid scam messages

    1. Keep your money and details safe - Never move money, make a payment or give personal or banking details for a message that comes out of the blue.
    2. Click with care - Only click on a link or download an attachment if you’re sure it’s genuine.
    3. Look at the spelling and layout - If it has mistakes or looks odd in any way, don’t reply and delete.
    4. Take your time - A scam may use warnings or threats to try to get you to act without thinking.
    5. Double-check before you pay - Confirm payment details before you pay an invoice or bill. Call the person or business on a number you trust, not one from an invoice or message.
  • NEW - Netflix scam email

    This is an email scam that can look like this:

    Screenshot of scam email

    Who does it target?

    Netflix customers.

    How does it work?

    Fraudsters send an email that claims to come from Netflix Support.

    The message says your account will be cancelled if you don’t update your personal details within 24 hours.

    It wants you to click a link to update them.

    This link will go to a fake Netflix page. The page may look real but it’s a copy to try to scam you in to giving login, credit card and billing address details.

    How to avoid this scam

    If you get an email like this, don’t click on the link.

    Delete the email. Don’t reply to it.

    Top tips to avoid scam messages

    1. Keep your money and details safe - Never move money, make a payment or give personal or banking details for a message that comes out of the blue.
    2. Click with care - Only click on a link or download an attachment if you’re sure it’s genuine.
    3. Look at the spelling and layout - If it has mistakes or looks odd in any way, don’t reply and delete.
    4. Take your time - A scam may use warnings or threats to try to get you to act without thinking.
    5. Double-check before you pay - Confirm payment details before you pay an invoice or bill. Call the person or business on a number you trust, not one from an invoice or message.
  • NEW - Coronavirus grant scam email

    This is an email scam that can look like this:

    Screenshot of scam email

    Who does it target?

    Anyone with an email account.

    How does it work?

    Fraudsters send an email that claims to come from a government agency, like HMRC.

    The message says your grant has been approved. This is pretending to be a scheme to help self-employed people during lockdown.

    It wants you to click on a link to fill in your information.  

    This link will go to a fake page to scam you in to giving your personal and banking details.

    How to avoid this scam

    If you get an email like this, don’t click on the link.

    Delete the email. Don’t reply to it.

    Top tips to avoid scam messages

    1. Keep your money and details safe - Never move money, make a payment or give personal or banking details for a message that comes out of the blue.
    2. Click with care - Only click on a link or download an attachment if you’re sure it’s genuine.
    3. Look at the spelling and layout - If it has mistakes or looks odd in any way, don’t reply and delete.
    4. Take your time - A scam may use warnings or threats to try to get you to act without thinking.
    5. Double-check before you pay - Confirm payment details before you pay an invoice or bill. Call the person or business on a number you trust, not one from an invoice or message.
  • NEW - Coronavirus TV licence scam email

    This is an email scam that can look like this:

    Screenshot of scam email

    Who does it target?

    Anyone with an email account.

    How does it work?

    Fraudsters send an email that claims to come from TV Licensing.

    The message says your direct debit has failed and you need to pay to avoid prosecution. It also offers you six months free TV licence.

    There’s a link to click to get this offer.  

    This link will go to a fake page to scam you in to giving your personal and banking details.

    How to avoid this scam

    If you get an email like this, don’t click on the link.

    Delete the email. Don’t reply to it.

    Top tips to avoid scam messages

    1. Keep your money and details safe - Never move money, make a payment or give personal or banking details for a message that comes out of the blue.
    2. Click with care - Only click on a link or download an attachment if you’re sure it’s genuine.
    3. Look at the spelling and layout - If it has mistakes or looks odd in any way, don’t reply and delete.
    4. Take your time - A scam may use warnings or threats to try to get you to act without thinking.
    5. Double-check before you pay - Confirm payment details before you pay an invoice or bill. Call the person or business on a number you trust, not one from an invoice or message.
  • NEW - Coronavirus tax refund scam email

    This is an email scam that can look like this:

    Screenshot of scam email

    Who does it target?

    Anyone with an email account.

    How does it work?

    Fraudsters send an email that claims to come from HMRC.

    The message says you can have a tax refund because of the coronavirus outbreak.

    It wants you to click on a link to get this refund.  

    This link goes to a fake page to try to scam you in to giving your personal and banking details.

    How to avoid this scam

    If you get an email like this, don’t click on the link.

    Delete the email. Don’t reply to it.

    Top tips to avoid scam messages

    1. Keep your money and details safe - Never move money, make a payment or give personal or banking details for a message that comes out of the blue.
    2. Click with care - Only click on a link or download an attachment if you’re sure it’s genuine.
    3. Look at the spelling and layout - If it has mistakes or looks odd in any way, don’t reply and delete.
    4. Take your time - A scam may use warnings or threats to try to get you to act without thinking.
    5. Double-check before you pay - Confirm payment details before you pay an invoice or bill. Call the person or business on a number you trust, not one from an invoice or message.
  • NEW - World Health Organisation (WHO) scam email

    This is an email scam that can look like this:

    Screenshot of scam email

    Who does it target?

    Anyone with an email account.

    How does it work?

    Fraudsters send an email that pretends to come from WHO.

    The message has a document attached with advice to help stop the spread of coronavirus.

    It wants you to download the document.  

    But it’s a fake document to try to put a computer virus on your device.

    How to avoid this scam

    If you get an email like this, don’t download the document.

    Delete the email. Don’t reply to it.

    Top tips to avoid scam messages

    1. Keep your money and details safe - Never move money, make a payment or give personal or banking details for a message that comes out of the blue.
    2. Click with care - Only click on a link or download an attachment if you’re sure it’s genuine.
    3. Look at the spelling and layout - If it has mistakes or looks odd in any way, don’t reply and delete.
    4. Take your time - A scam may use warnings or threats to try to get you to act without thinking.
    5. Double-check before you pay - Confirm payment details before you pay an invoice or bill. Call the person or business on a number you trust, not one from an invoice or message.

Social Media scams

  • Facebook bait and switch scams

    What to look out for:

    Fraudsters are using social media posts to send fake links to viral videos. These will appear as shared posts on popular places like Facebook. This is a bait and switch scam. The link goes to a fake site with a video. But a pop-up will ask you to update your video player with a download. The download will infect your device with a virus to steal personal and banking details. It will also send the fake post to your friends to try and scam them too.

    What you should do:

    • If you’re not sure who a person is on social media, then don’t connect with them. Some accounts are fake and just try to steal details.
    • Don’t click on any links or attachments unless you know they’re safe.  
    • Make sure a site is safe before you give personal details.

  • Free supermarket voucher scam

    What to look out for

    You might see a free voucher offer on Facebook from Morrisons or Tesco. It looks real and says it's for 'Today only'. But it's a scam. The link takes you to a fake website to fill in a survey. Then to get the voucher you have to click on another fake link and share your personal details. There are no vouchers. And your details could be used to try and defraud you at a later date.

    What you should do

    • Make sure a site is safe before you give personal details.
    • Ignore sites and emails that offer free things if you give your personal details.
    • Tell friends and family about this scam, especially if they shop at those stores.
    • Don’t click on any links or attachments unless you know they’re safe.
    Free Supermarket Voucher Scam 1
    Free Supermarket Voucher Scam 2
    Free Supermarket Voucher Scam 3
  • PayPal social media scams

    What to look out for:

    You may see fake PayPal social media posts that ask you to enter a prize draw. These will appear as promoted or shared posts on popular places like Facebook. They will ask you to follow a link to log on. This is a scam. The link will lead to a fake site to try and steal your personal details. 

    What you should do:

    • If you’re not sure who a person is then don’t connect with them. Some accounts are fake and just try to steal details.
    • Don’t click on any links or attachments unless you know they’re safe.  
    • Make sure a site is safe before you give personal details.

     

Scam messages

  • Coronavirus scam

    What to look out for

    People are using the coronavirus outbreak as an opportunity to try new scams by email, call and text.  

    One email has a PDF document with up-to-date advice on the outbreak. This is likely to be a scam

    The document could contain a computer virus to infect your device. This will then try to steal your personal or payment details.

    What you should do

    • Don’t open emails if you don’t know who sent them.
    • Even if you know the sender, don’t reply if an email looks odd. 
    • Look out for spelling mistakes and a messy layout. 
    • Don’t click on any links or attachments unless you know they’re safe.
    • If you’re not sure about an email, call the sender using a number from their site. Don’t call the number in an email or pop up.

    Find out more about scam messages.

    Coronavirus scams even use online marketplaces such as Facebook to sell goods like face masks and hand sanitisers that don’t exist.

    Before you buy anything online it’s best to do some research and check buyer reviews to make sure a seller is genuine. And always pay by card - that way you protect your cash.

    Find out more about buying from online shops.

  • Fake DVLA texts

    What to look out for

    There’s been an increase in DVLA scams online. 

    The most popular scam is by text message. It will tell you that you’re owed a refund and ask you to click on a link. The link will take you to a page which asks for personal or account details. 

    This is likely to be a scam to try and steal your details.  

    What you should do

    • Be careful about opening texts that you didn’t expect.
    • Don’t click on any links or attachments unless you’re sure they are genuine.
    • If you’re unsure, call the DVLA. Use a number from their website, not one from a text.

     

    Free Supermarket Voucher Scam 1
  • Apple ID email scams

    What to look out for:

    You may get an email that looks like it comes from Apple. It will tell you that your card has been used to order something. The subject of the email could be either ‘Receipt ID’, ‘Receipt Order’ or ‘Payment Statement’. This is a scam. The email is fake and will try to get you to follow a link or attachment to cancel the order. The scam will try to steal your personal and banking details.

    What you should do:

    • Don’t open emails if you don’t know who sent them.
    • Check the sender’s email address to make sure it’s genuine.
    • Don’t click on any links or attachments unless you know they’re safe.
    • If you’re not sure about an email, call the sender using a number from their site. Don’t call the number in an email or pop-up.

     

    Apple Image 1
    Apple Image 2
  • Apple ID text scam

    What to look out for:

    Fraudsters are sending texts which look like they’re from Apple. It will tell you that your account has been locked and to click on a link to unlock it. This is a scam. The link takes you to a fake page to try and steal your personal or banking details.

    What you should do:

    • Be careful about opening texts that you didn’t expect.
    • Don’t click on any links or attachments unless you know they’re safe.
    • If you’re not sure about a text, call the sender using a number from their site. Don’t call the number in a text.

  • British Gas email scam

    What to look out for

    You could get an email that looks like it's from British Gas. It will say that your latest payment by direct debit didn't go through and your gas supply could be cut off. They want you to click on a link to check and update your payment details. This is a scam. The link is to a fake site to try and get your personal or payment details.

    What you should do

    • Don't open emails if you don't know who sent them.
    • Check the sender's email address to make sure it's genuine.
    • Don't click on any links or attachments unless you know they're safe.
    • If you're not sure about an email, call the sender using a number from their site. Don't call the number in an email or pop up.
  • Google calendar email scam

    What to look out for

    Fraudsters are sending fake emails that include a Google calendar invite. The subject of the event is in Russian and has a link to a video call. This is a scam. The link is there to try and steal your personal or banking details, or to infect your device. Your spam filter should pick this scam up. But to help protect yourself, you can follow these steps:

    1. Open Google Calendar settings. 
    2. Go to Event Settings, find Automatically Add Invitations and select the option ‘No, only show invitations to which I've responded.’
    3. Also, under View Options, make sure that ‘Show declined events’ is unchecked, so scam events don’t appear after they’re declined.

    What you should do

    • Don’t open emails if you don’t know who sent them.
    • Check the sender’s email address to make sure it’s genuine.
    • Don’t click on any links or attachments unless you know they’re safe.
    • If you’re not sure about an email, call the sender using a number from their site. Don’t call the number in an email or pop-up

     

  • PayPal email scams

    What to look out for:

    Fraudsters are using emails that look like they come from PayPal. A common message will tell you that there’s a ‘problem with your account’. It will include a link to follow to sort the problem out. This is a scam. The link will take you to a fake PayPal site to try and steal your personal or banking details, or to infect your device with a virus.
     

    Another fake PayPal email will tell you that ‘you’re a prize winner’. But to collect your prize you must pay a small handling fee. This is also a scam. PayPal email scams.
     

    What you should do

    • Don’t open emails if you don’t know who sent them.
    • Check the sender’s email address to make sure it’s genuine.
    • Don’t click on any links or attachments unless you know they’re safe.
    • If you’re not sure about an email, call the sender using a number from their site. Don’t call the number in an email or pop-up.
       
  • Royal Mail message scam

    What to look out for

    You could get an email or a text that looks like it's from Royal Mail. It will say that they couldn't deliver a parcel and will give a tracking number. They want you to click on a link to confirm the parcel or pay a fee. This is a scam. The link is to a fake site to try and get your personal or payment details.

    What you should do

    • Don't open emails if you don't know who sent them.
    • Check the sender's email address to make sure it's genuine.
    • Don't click on any links or attachments unless you know they're safe.
    • If you're not sure about an email, call the sender using a number from their site. Don't call the number in an email or pop up.
    Royal Mail Scam 1
    Royal Mail Scam 2
    Royal Mail Scam 4

Think you’ve fallen for a scam?

You should contact us right away if you think you’ve been scammed. We can then guide you on what to do next.

Contact us now
  • Take Five

    You can get straight forward, impartial advice on how to avoid scams from Take Five.

    Action Fraud

    You can report a crime or get general advice from Action Fraud. They help banks and other companies combat fraud.

    Get Safe Online

    They offer advice on how to keep yourself and your devices safe from fraud.

    UK Finance

    UK Finance is there to support customers and to help make sure it's safe to bank.

    Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA)

    The PRA is part of the Bank of England. Their role is to make sure banks act safely and reduce the chance of them losing money.

    Financial Conduct Authority (FCA)

    The FCA is there to make sure banks work well so customers are protected and get a fair deal.

    CIFAS

    CIFAS can help to protect your identity. They can stop fraudsters from using your details to apply for things in your name.

    Cyber Aware

    This is a government site that gives advice on how to stay safe online.

    ScamSmart

    This is part of the FCA site. You can use it to check on an investment or pension deals to help you avoid scams.

    Bank of Scotland does not control the content of any of the websites linked to on this page.